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Nick Geboers


Nick Geboers (BE, 1987) lives and works in Balen, Belgium. In 2012 he received his BFA in Photography from Sint Lukas Higher College for Arts and Science in Brussels. He went on to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp where he obtained his MFA in Photography in 2014. He is currently working on the research project How To Hunt With The Camera, at The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp and supported by FLACC.

As an image-seeker fascinated by its rich history, he is excavating the photographic medium from the functional to the aesthetic. First and foremost an image maker, he deploys an extensive variety of photographic instruments and techniques. He is also a collector of negatives that were once made for scientific or descriptive purposes but which appear now - when their context has been lost - as enigmatic artefacts.
Nick Geboers combines his own photographs and acquired images in visual constructions, provoking a wide gamut of possible readings. Diverse photographic traditions and their visual specificity suggest different narratives. Balancing between the position of an archaeologist and a visual artist allows him to work in a free space between hard and soft sciences, hoping to find concrete facts and poetic truths.

How To Hunt With The Camera refers to a book published in 1926 by William Nesbit. In his introduction, the author reminisces about a day spent on his grandfathers’ farm. On this particular day he shot two ducks. The first one was a direct hit. The second duck took off, but after noticing its partner was hurt, came back to offer help. This served the hunter well as he managed to shoot the second duck. Later in his life, the author recognised that the duck had shown compassion and loyalty. Every time William Nesbit recalls this event, he regrets having killed both ducks. At the end of this introduction he proposes to exchange guns for cameras and the book describes - in surprisingly many ways - how to apply the camera to photograph nature. Today, after nearly 100 years of technological and visual advancements, How To Hunt With The Camera still serves as an inspiration.

One particular camera Nick Geboers is interested in is the Fernkamera 3M*: a military apparatus developed during WWI. With a focal length of 3 meters, it was used to observe strategic points in the distance up to 20km far. It was exclusively owned and used as a surveillance instrument by the military, so other pictorial applications of this large format camera are left unexplored.
By interpreting, rebuilding and using such an instrument, Nick Geboers wants to research the complex relation between operator, apparatus and the subject.

*Carl Zeiss Jena started working on the design of the lens and housing in 1914. After WWI, following the treaty of Versailles, Germany was not longer allowed to produce military equipment. To bypass this law, Carl Zeiss Jena founded the company Nedinsco (Nederlandse Instrumenten Compagnie) as a subdivision. The Nedinsco factory was built just across the Dutch border, in the city of Venlo. This allowed the continuation of its production line of newly developed and specialised optics.
During WWII The Nedinsco archives were largely destroyed by fires caused by air raids. Whatever remained was lost in a second catastrophe, a flood of the river Maas. This series of events obscure the history of the Fernkamera 3M, making it a rare artefact on which little is known.

Nick Geboers


Nick Geboers (BE, 1987) lives and works in Balen, Belgium. In 2012 he received his BFA in Photography from Sint Lukas Higher College for Arts and Science in Brussels. He went on to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp where he obtained his MFA in Photography in 2014. He is currently working on the research project How To Hunt With The Camera, at The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp and supported by FLACC.

As an image-seeker fascinated by its rich history, he is excavating the photographic medium from the functional to the aesthetic. First and foremost an image maker, he deploys an extensive variety of photographic instruments and techniques. He is also a collector of negatives that were once made for scientific or descriptive purposes but which appear now - when their context has been lost - as enigmatic artefacts.
Nick Geboers combines his own photographs and acquired images in visual constructions, provoking a wide gamut of possible readings. Diverse photographic traditions and their visual specificity suggest different narratives. Balancing between the position of an archaeologist and a visual artist allows him to work in a free space between hard and soft sciences, hoping to find concrete facts and poetic truths.

How To Hunt With The Camera refers to a book published in 1926 by William Nesbit. In his introduction, the author reminisces about a day spent on his grandfathers’ farm. On this particular day he shot two ducks. The first one was a direct hit. The second duck took off, but after noticing its partner was hurt, came back to offer help. This served the hunter well as he managed to shoot the second duck. Later in his life, the author recognised that the duck had shown compassion and loyalty. Every time William Nesbit recalls this event, he regrets having killed both ducks. At the end of this introduction he proposes to exchange guns for cameras and the book describes - in surprisingly many ways - how to apply the camera to photograph nature. Today, after nearly 100 years of technological and visual advancements, How To Hunt With The Camera still serves as an inspiration.

One particular camera Nick Geboers is interested in is the Fernkamera 3M*: a military apparatus developed during WWI. With a focal length of 3 meters, it was used to observe strategic points in the distance up to 20km far. It was exclusively owned and used as a surveillance instrument by the military, so other pictorial applications of this large format camera are left unexplored.
By interpreting, rebuilding and using such an instrument, Nick Geboers wants to research the complex relation between operator, apparatus and the subject.

*Carl Zeiss Jena started working on the design of the lens and housing in 1914. After WWI, following the treaty of Versailles, Germany was not longer allowed to produce military equipment. To bypass this law, Carl Zeiss Jena founded the company Nedinsco (Nederlandse Instrumenten Compagnie) as a subdivision. The Nedinsco factory was built just across the Dutch border, in the city of Venlo. This allowed the continuation of its production line of newly developed and specialised optics.
During WWII The Nedinsco archives were largely destroyed by fires caused by air raids. Whatever remained was lost in a second catastrophe, a flood of the river Maas. This series of events obscure the history of the Fernkamera 3M, making it a rare artefact on which little is known.

Nick Geboers

How To Hunt With The Camera

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